Stitch fun series – Ebroidering different types of petals


Good morning! Sharing with you all today one of the link from Mary’s website of embroidering different types of petals.

rose-leaf-stitch-01 raised-fishbone-01 mission-rose-embroidery-53 Long_Short_Stitch_197 Long_Short_Stitch_133 closed-cretan-stitch-leaf-16

Do you want to add more variety to your hand embroidery projects by stitching different types of leaves or flowers?

After all, when you look at flowers and foliage in their natural setting, they’re rarely exactly the same!

Since flowers and leaves are probably the most common motif in hand embroidery, it’s good to have a whole arsenal of stitching techniques on hand for embroidering them.

Here are sixteen different ways you can embroider leaves and flower petals.

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Stitch fun series – Shisha Embroidery


Shisha embroidery – or mirror embroidery – is kind of addicting, you know?

You get started with the traditional shisha stitch, and before you know it, variation after variation presents itself – all of them lending to further adornment with more stitches – and the next thing you know, every time you turn around, you’re thinking of some other way to attach mirrors to fabric!

To read more click here

Stitch Play- Shisha, No Mirrors


mirror-stitches-01 mirror-stitches-02 mirror-stitches-03

Mary Corbet shares her variation of  Shisha embroidery stitch without using mirror.  She is suggesting that you play around with your stitches by mirroring them. Mirroring a row of embroidery stitches is a good way to create an interesting border or heavy line.

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stitch Play: Chain Stitch Spider Daisy by Mary Corbert


It’s Monday and let’s start our week by bringing some excitement and variations in our stitching. Once again sharing the article from Mary Corbet’s Stitch play series.

This is a neat little flower technique, if you want to add simple flowers with a bit of texture and color contrast on them to your embroidery projects. It’s a daisy created with the detached chain stitch and ribbed spider web stitch.

The flower starts with a basic daisy stitched with detached chain stitch.  8 petals are used as it’s easy to space an even number of petals! You can use as many or as few petals as you wish.

 

You’ll end up with a really cute flower, with lots of possibilities for further embellishment!

Read more………..

Stitch Play: Combining Chain Stitch and Buttonhole Stitch


Let’s start the week with a bit of Stitch play!

chain and buttonhole stitch

If you’re doodling about with hand embroidery stitches, and you’re looking for a way to create a wide line with a bit of added interest to it, you might like this simple combination of chain stitch and buttonhole stitch.

    

Combining chain stitch and buttonhole stitch in layers is not a new idea. There’s a certain type of needlework called Parma embroidery (which Jeanine demonstrates on her blog Italian Needlework) that combines three rows of chain stitch topped by two facing rows of buttonhole stitch worked close together. Parma embroidery is a whitework technique that produces a very textured line due to the closely worked buttonhole stitches. …….Read More…..

Stitch Play: Whipping Two Rows of Chain Stitch


Stitch Play: Whipping Two Rows of Chain Stitch

whipped-double-chain

Whipping two adjacent rows of chain stitch produces a wide line with a rope-like centre. This is a fun technique for creating a textured line, and it only takes a little imagination to see how you can incorporate this into your surface embroidery.

Browsing through the Needle N’thread blog came across this interesting series of Stitch Play by Mary Corbet. She has come up with the ideas of combinations of textural stitches that can be used to give new and exciting look to the embroidery. She has demonstrated these techniques in detail, step by step and with pictures.

Some readers have commented that they have used this technique for textural motifs (like tree bark, cacti etc),  also in applique because of its 3D effect, some made handles for little baskets – or vines with appliqued leaves. This technique looks very interesting and easy. Try it ladies and give us your feedback….you might come up with something more exciting and exceptional.

Read in detail

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