Swedish Embroidery


swedis embroiderySwedish weaving — also called Huck darning and Huck embroidery — combines darning, embroidery and weaving to create decorative edges for pillows, towels, blankets, tablecloths, place mats, etc. The designs are usually geometric in nature, and worked primarily along the surface of the cloth rather than going up and down through the cloth. This embroidery is a free hand style of that utilises stem stitch, satin stitch, feather stitch and French knots to great effect.

swedish embroidery2

Read more about this embroidery on following websites:

http://www.nordicneedle.net/stitching-techniques/huck-swedish-weaving/

http://www.ehow.com/way_5426955_swedish-weaving-beginners.html?ref=Track2&utm_source=ask

Advertisements

MARY HICKMOTT’S MASTER CLASSES 2014 – Details of the Projects


KENYA  EMBROIDERERS’  GUILD

MARY HICKMOTT’S  MASTER CLASSES 2014

Details of the projects being taught in each session

Although they are called master classes we anticipate beginners too and the instructions are very comprehensive.  Those who have done embroidery before will probably make faster progress than newcomers, but all should have no problem finishing the projects given time.

Class will start at 9.30am and finish by 3.30pm.

candlewickingCANDLEWICKING  – 25th February 2014

This incorporates the use of colonial knots and stem stitch together.  Whilst doing this class you will also learn how to trace designs onto your fabric.  Using 28 count Annabelle fabric and Caron Watercolour threads that change colour along their length the effect is quite simple but stunning.

swedis embroiderySWEDISH EMBROIDERY – -26th February 2014

A free hand style of embroidery that utilises stem stitch, satin stitch, feather stitch and French knots to great effect. It is sewn on felt using 13 colours of Appletons Crewel wool and the finished size can be up to 8 x 12 inches.  This class gives you the chance to experiment and will be good fun.

Fine HardangerFINE HARDANGER – 27th February 2014

This project uses 28 count even weave and anchor perle in sizes 8 and 12.  The thicker thread is variegated and it is lovely to see the colour running through from blues to pinks as you sew.  It is finer than ‘standard’ hardanger which gives it a lacier effect.  Careful counting is required to start off, but the project soon grows quickly

Cherries in frame_1

TUFTED NEDDLEPOINT EMBROIDERY – 4th March 2014

This design incorporates several stitches whilst using only four colours of anchor tapestry wool.  It is sewn on 12 count canvas so still has a delicate look to it despite being sewn in wool.  The cherries in the centre are ‘tufted and give a lovely 3D effect, whilst the border uses several counted canvas stitches to complete the design.’

2014 3 work togetherWESSEX EMBROIDERY – 5th March 2014

A counted technique with a difference. Each square is filled in with a pattern using chain stitch, fly stitch, straight stitch and French knots using 14 different colours in a variety of combinations.  This is sewn on 28 count even weave using anchor stranded cottons.

2014 gold threadGOLDEN ILLUSION – 6th March2014

This is a spectacular project sewn on Red 14 count Aida using 3 of the Krenik range of gold metallic threads namely Cord, fine braid and 1/16th ribbon.  Each section in the completed sampler is a different pattern and stitch.  Whilst this project has the most variety of stitches it is also a joy to stitch due to the ease of using aida and the very clear concise instructions.

CandleWicking Embroidery


The first master class by Mary Hickmott is going to be on candlewicking embroidery on 25th February 2014.

Candlewicking is a traditional form of embroidery based on the colonial knot. It is a type of whitework or white-on-white embroidery. Large knots are embroidered in heavy thread on heavier-weight cotton or linen embroidery fabric . It gets its name from the nature of the soft spun cotton thread, which was braided then used to form the wick for candles.

Originally, unwaxed candle wick thread was used as it was available easily and was inexpensive . Selecting embroidery threads for a candlewick project depends entirely on the finished size of the knot. Projects that are smaller in scale and worked with smaller knots can be stitched using #5 or #8 pearl cotton or regular embroidery floss, separating the six strands into the appropriate-sized groups. These threads are also available in multiple colors.

Candlewicking patterns are very simple having geometric shapes, small motifs and floral patterns. Patterns are marked on fabric  involving evenly-spaced dots and each dot on the pattern represents one colonial knot.

One can refer to the following website for step by step guidance

http://www.wikihow.com/Do-Candlewicking 

http://crossstitch.about.com/od/candlewicking/a/candlewicking.htm

Today’s Tip in choosing fabric


Getting started and Choosing the fabric

The choice of fabric on which you are going to stitch is very personal and depends on the design, how you are going to use the piece, your personal preference etc.

Aida
Because Aida is a “blockweave” fabric, the holes through which you stitch are very apparent which makes stitching faster than on an evenweave.
However, if the design you are stitching does not cover the whole of the fabric, these holes may detract from the finished appearance of the piece, since they are visible. The higher the count of the Aida, the smaller and less apparent are the holes.
Fractional stitches and backstitch are less easy on Aida than on evenweave or linen and you may need to switch to an embroidery or “sharp” needle to make them easier.
Aida may be 100% cotton, a cotton/man-made fibre blend or 100% man-made fibre. The less man-made fibre, the softer the Aida is likely to feel.

Evenweave
The threads of evenweave are spun so that they are the same thickness all along their length. They are also spaced evenly from each other on both warp and weft (vertical and horizontal). You can work over single threads in the fabric, or (more usually over 2 threads.
Working on evenweave is slightly slower than on Aida.
If the design you are stitching does not cover the whole of the fabric, the finished appearance is more attractive to some people because there are no obvious holes and blocks of fabric.
Some people prefer the feel and/or appearance of evenweave.
Fractional stitches and back stitch are easier on evenweave.
Evenweave may be 100% cotton, a cotton/man-made fibre blend or 100% man-made fibre.

Linen
This is an evenweave fabric made from natural linen threads where the threads are spaced evenly from each other but, because of the nature if linen, the threads may vary in thickness along their length. This gives a more rustic or antique look to the finished piece of work.
Working on linen is slightly slower than on Aida.
If the design you are stitching does not cover the whole of the fabric, the finished appearance is more attractive to some people because there are no obvious holes and blocks of fabric. If you are stitching an antique style sampler, it will look more “authentic” on linen.
Some people prefer the feel of linen, which tends to be softer than either Aida or evenweave.
Fractional stitches and back stitch are easier on linen than on Aida
Linen fabric is almost always 100% natural.

In short:
If the design you are stitching completely covers the fabric and does not use fractional stitches or back stitch, then there is little or no advantage in stitching on linen/eveneave (unless you enjoy the feel of the material) – use Aida it will be faster.

Hardanger
This is usually 22 count evenweave. It can be used for cross stitch (stitching over either 1 or 2 thread)s but is mainly used for pulled or drawn thread work eg Hardanger work.
Hardanger may be 100% cotton, a cotton/man-made fibre blend or 100% man-made fibre.

However:

Please note

Some designs are not suitable for Aida.
This is usually because there are lots of fractional stitches or a part of the design (eg a face) may be stitched over one strand of linen or evenweave to provide finer detail.
If a chart recommends linen or evenweave check why before you decide to stitch it on Aida to avoid disappointment when you get to the area which will just not work on Aida.

Stitching on black or other dark fabric
Stitch in a very good light.

Use Daylight bulbs.

Spread a piece of white material on your lap.

Use an illuminated lap tray.

Taken from a website http://www.xstitch4u.com/

%d bloggers like this: